Obama may raise taxes on everyone — again

Higher gas taxes?

Are higher gas taxes in store for us?

Ever since 2008, President Obama has presented himself as a champion of the middle and lower class, maintaining a steadfast refusal to raise taxes on all but those earning $250K or more. It’s all been a sham and he’s about to do it again.

On Super Bowl Sunday in 2011, the president told Fox News host Bill O’Reilly, “I didn’t raise taxes once. I lowered taxes over the last two years.”

In response, PolitiFact.com decided to check. They found that “the idea that Obama did not raise taxes is just plain wrong.” I would have used a different word, but I suppose “wrong” works.

Shortly after assuming office, Obama raised taxes on tobacco which affects lower income classes because a larger portion of their income would pay for these products. PolitiFact also noted that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — Obamacare — includes many new taxes, including a tanning salon tax.

Now, with a fiscal cliff looming, talks are turning to raising the gasoline tax. If it becomes a reality, it will affect lower classes more than those of the upper echelon because, like the tobacco example above, a larger percentage of their income goes to gasoline.

According to Sunday’s Wall Street Journal:

The White House and Congress are trying to craft a broad deficit-reduction deal to substitute for the so-called fiscal cliff, a $500 billion combination of tax increases and spending cuts set to begin Jan. 2. State highway officials and industries that stand to benefit from increased highway spending—including road builders and heavy-equipment makers—are among those pressing lawmakers to raise the 18.4-cent-a-gallon federal gasoline tax as part of an agreement.

And what do advocacy groups have to say about it? Dan Kadish, of the Institute for Energy Research remarked, “Basically, you’ve got a bunch of people waiting in the wings to stick the collection plate out and grab whatever they can grab.”

However it goes, one thing is for certain. It’s always easier to raise taxes than it is to cut expenses. Politicians always seem to opt for the easy road, and to hell with the taxpayer.

Read more in “The Driver’s Seat” in The Wall Street Journal.

In the following video, Grover Norquist of Americans for aTax Reform debates Neera Tanden, who runs the Center for American Progress on the issue of the multiple Obamacare tax increases what affect the poor. This was from CBS News’ “Face the Nation.”

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